Natasha - Women construction

Natasha
Leighton
Site Manager
How long have you been working in construction?

3 Years 6 Months

Why do you think it is important to have women working in what in theory is a male dominated working environment?

Prior to Emily Wilding Davidson throwing herself in front of the King’s horse at the 1913 Derby women were classed as second class citizens without the right to vote and prohibited from many industries.

Her successor in the Suffragette movement Emily Pankhurst created a female workforce after the breakout of WWI: Here we saw the emergence of change in attitude towards woman and the country began to realise they needed to tap this as yet unused and under-privileged workforce.

I believe the country still has a long way to go to reach total inclusive and equal mind-set, and within construction I have seen many changes within the last 10 years, with woman being respected in the workplace and on site, earnt through their professionalism, knowledge and self-belief they are every bit as entitled to do the job as anyone else.

Why do you love construction?

This is one of the few industries where you’re a part of the whole process from start to finish with a zero harm stance on health and safety, following processes and procedures to ensure quality standards are met. As a site manager I get a sense of achievement from my team’s hard work and dedication seeing projects in a variety of locations and landmarks.

Why is Elliott a good employer for equality?

I love being a part of Elliott as they invest in all of their employees promoting for ability without discrimination, sharing and encouraging their vision and values. As a female in this company I have no equality fears as I have faith in my team and peers and knowing key roles such as Directors, Regional Service Managers, Project Managers, Site Managers, Maintenance Operatives (to name a few) are filled by woman, who are role models to myself and many others, inspiring me to push and train harder to reach the next level of success.

Why do you think that the work the Suffragettes did is important?

Prior to Emily Wilding Davidson throwing herself in front of the King’s horse at the 1913 Derby women were classed as second class citizens without the right to vote and prohibited from many industries.

Her successor in the Suffragette movement Emily Pankhurst created a female workforce after the breakout of WWI: Here we saw the emergence of change in attitude towards woman and the country began to realise they needed to tap this as yet unused and under-privileged workforce.

I believe the country still has a long way to go to reach total inclusive and equal mind-set, and within construction I have seen many changes within the last 10 years, with woman being respected in the workplace and on site, earnt through their professionalism, knowledge and self-belief they are every bit as entitled to do the job as anyone else.